Interviews / 27 March, 2020

Mariusz Mieszkac: “Techno music is arising again”

The Valladolid DJ manages to continue producing despite the hiatus while continuing to project ideas through Pink Flamingo’s, his own recording and streaming studio.


Mariusz Mieszkac takes the call from MOAI Magazine while preparing a set to present on Instagram live streaming. The coronavirus crisis affected the entire music industry and for the Valladolid DJ is no exception. “On the first day of confinement I had an event that I had to cancel and do live streaming from my studio,” he says.

His music is oriented to techno but as he explains, it is now closer to something more visceral and industrial . His opinion on techno is rather open, ranging from dark to progressive and even covers things from house. “In the end, if you mix a house song with two other speedy techno songs, in the end what sounds to you on the speakers is techno.”

Mariusz Mieszkac is the pseudonym for Mario Moran Coca. He chose it a few years ago, when after a four-year hiatus due to work commitments he was able to return to Valladolid and DJ at clubs again. “I took advantage of all that time to prepare myself and be ready to jump the booths. When you have a passion for this, even if you cannot access to play in front of an audience, you always have the motivation to continue with the music. At the time I had a partner named Mariusz, and I realized that the name was much cooler than Mario, “he admits.

He then translated “Mario Morán” into Polish and the result gave him his final stage name. “In addition, both included the ‘sz’, which helped me design the logo,” he details. His return to Valladolid also marked the beginning of his project called Pink Flamingo’s: a studio from which he manages a streaming platform and organizes showcases and DJ courses. “DJs come to the studio, which is fully equipped for live and video recording. I record and stream them from the platform. Right now we work on the real content on Facebook and use Instragram as a marketing space, “he explains.

When thinking about a scene where he can project himself as an artist, Mariusz Mieszkac immediately mentions Berlin, although he has his qualms about the cultural current affairs of the German capital. “Lately it is becoming the new Ibiza and it pulls me back a lot. The posture in underground music is being sold. Fashion and underground do not go hand in hand. Techno is becoming fashionable and I want to go back to the roots. I love to play raves, for example, although I don’t get paid”.

As an alternative to this reality, Mariusz Mieszkac highlights the Dutch scene. “In northern Europe electronics is highly valued,” he says. According to him, festivals such as Dekmantel or Awakenings are committed to maintaining the essence of techno. “But in Spain we cannot complain because things are going very well,” he adds. “Techno is growing a lot again. This high of EDM and house in the end has left followers for electronic music, so it wasn’t too bad. At festivals you have the mainstream tent and next to it a house and then a techno one. It was inevitable that people would pass by the roof top tent and people would say ‘damn, this is cool too.’

One of his biggest influences has been Ben Sims, and despite the fact that time has separated them in terms of musical style -Sims has developed a career focused on techno groove, contrary to the industrial style that Mariusz forged in these years- the Valladolid based DJ highlights the points in common. “I always recall my influences and compose funky or disco-style things that I can sneak into a techno session. In the end, techno and house come from those musics.” While choosing a current influence he recalls Cristian Varela, with whom he took courses recently and for whom he eventually works on song selection. “He is a powerhouse of Spanish techno together with Oscar Mulero”, he highlights.

All clues lead to the hypothesis that Mariusz Mieszkac’s career has no ceiling. However, his perspective on the recovery of the electronic scene regarding the coronavirus crisis is not entirely encouraging: “I think it will take a while. Even if you could do events again, which I don’t think is immediate, the audience would be a little reluctant, “he says.” While there will be a lot wanting to go out partying, many others will have reservations about not getting infected.  The world of electronics has always been closely linked to the country’s economy. I noticed a lot of change in the Spanish crisis of 2008 in how we worked with clubs, so logically there will be a slight break in this regard. We will have to knock on wood and have faith that this will happen as soon as possible ”.

 

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